29 March 2009

Dry Spell


I've hit one.

Looking for things that are haunting, inspiring, bizarre and refreshing.

Music, art, holes in the wall, the unexpected.

MTBE is on pause, pending results.

9 comments:

rootlesscosmo said...

Anthony Braxton?

Buster said...

Yes, yes, though I feel like Braxton is an endless hole for spending money exploring all his work, of which I know only surface scratches. Maybe I should see what Brooklyn Public Library has, though that will require paying some long overdue overdue fees...

I've also been trying stuff like this on for size. Still not sure how it fits.

rootlesscosmo said...

an endless hole for spending money exploring all his work

You mean a rich and varied oeuvre? Absolutely, and I don't know more than about a tenth of it; I like the live solo albums. His musical knowledge is astonishing and he manages to reformulate it into original work a lot of the time, rather than just pastiche.

That's an interesting track you linked to. What can you tell me about it?

rootlesscosmo said...

...but saints preserve us from the prose on the languageofstone site!

Anonymous said...

Do you know this woman?

http://www.answers.com/topic/yelena-khanga

It would be interesting to hear your informed opinions and annotations of her life story ...

Kai in NYC

kg said...

Well, since you have a membership, MoMA would seem like a natural (and cheap!) place to look for the bizarre and inspiring. Speaking of South America, this looks good: http://moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/870; and for the film buff/ NY state history buff in us all, so does this: http://moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/297; this might also be the time to track down a whole bunch of WPA murals scattered around NYC. Or that's what I'd do...

kg said...

And for crying outloud, go here already! http://www.folkartmuseum.org/
It doesn't get any weirder (or more inspiring!) than Henry Darger!!!

Buster said...

Kai,

Yes, I know Yelena Khanga. I've met her a couple of times and know her family. She is a talented and savvy person, but probably has as much in common with her grandparents (who are a part of the group of people I study) as William Browder has in common with his granddad:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/world/europe/24kremlin.html

(This, by the way, is how an historian deflects a question about the present and folks who aren't dead.)

rootlesscosmo said...

Mr. Browder does not know exactly why the Kremlin turned against him.

I bet Jacques Duclos' granddaughter could tell him.